Fendi Fan di Fendi

18 Mar

My first experience of Fan di Fendi was at the duty free shop at JFK airport.

I was wandering around in a hunger-induced daze, when a friendly SA suggested I try Fan di Fendi and sprayed some on a card for me before I could respond. As she held the bottle up for me to see, she smiled and said, “It’s Italian” as if that should mean something specific to me. Before rolling my eyes, I decided to allow her words to reverberate through me. Something about the way she said them made the floor drop out from under me.

It was almost embarrassing to try Fan di Fendi right there as she looked on because I was so moved. Not by what her words meant to me, but by what I sensed they meant to her. As I held the test strip up to my nose, those moments became frozen in time.

Fan di Fendi smelled powerful, but nondescript. Common, but very well-balanced, as if it contained a little bit of every contemporary high-end designer fragrance on the market, all in one fragrance, in equal complimentary proportions.

I carried the test strip around in my bag the entire time I was in Florida, and by the time I came back, Fan di Fendi was a Sun-faded memory.

About six months later, I tried Fan di Fendi again while at Sephora, and took a small sample home to spend some time with.

On application I got the same green citrus opening followed by non-specific CGI florals plus leather, powder, etc. This time the floor did not drop away as I sniffed, but I still found it quite pleasing.

Recently, I read an article by Serguey Borisov on Fragrantica about the olfactory white phenomenon in fragrance, which supposedly occurs when all scents weigh in against each other simultaneously with equal potency (or something like that) such that it is impossible to detect anything specific in the olfactory digital snow. During the same week, I also happened to read another article  from the Huffington Post about two artists who collaborated on the creation of one fragrance by literally mixing together every fragrance that had been released in the year 2012. Their art experiment also seemed to be a white noise fragrance attempt of sorts.

Smelling Fan di Fendi for the second time reminded me of those white scent articles. Fan di Fendi is all the colors in equal proportions, and they are not pastels.

This fragrance also conjures memories of walking around a city on a very bright Sunny day. It is not tropical destination Sun, so much as stark urban Sun. Bright light beating down onto the expensive leather handbag of a typically sexy woman, as she leans against a Sun-drenched wall outside of her office building to take a smoke break.

The notion of Sunlight makes sense because light from the Sun emits all the colors at once in equal proportions, so to us it appears white, or invisible.

I would recommend this to anyone who wants to slap on a label that reads: I Am Urban Chic. On the right person, this could work as an every day fragrance, for a date, for the office, or even for a more formal occasion. It projects, so be careful, and longevity is definitely not an issue.

Because Fan di Fendi is my white noise fragrance of the moment, I find it to be relatively unmemorable and at the same time it has found a special place in my heart. Perhaps under the right conditions, its white light is momentarily refracted to form a rainbow.

Perhaps it’s the way the SA smiled when she said, “It’s Italian.”

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