Tag Archives: Osmanthus

Jo Malone Osmanthus Blossom

4 May

Osmanthus Blossom is a boldly green citrus with water/flower notes. I would rename it Petitgrain Blossom. The reps at my Jo Malone boutique were very generous to give me a big fat sample when I stopped in to say hello.

Osmanthus Blossom opens with sweet and tart, crisp juicy lychee-ish, fruity “water” notes, accompanied by bright, ambiguously green citrus medley (petitgrain with sugar-dipped lime wedges and bergamot oil…maybe even a tea note?)..

The dry down loses some of the sparkle and tang of the opening and contains mostly mild, sunny-sweet powder and green notes which again lean more toward the lotus, petitgrain-citrus direction, than any other. There is also a hint of light, ambiguous woods with the water and powder (a high-quality aquatic musk) toward the very end.

I feel that this is an easy composition, green, sweet, springy, and not representative of anything realistic.

It is an impressionistic fragrance, but my impression of the actual osmanthus bush/tree (one of my all time favorites) is not similar to this fragrance. I don’t usually get hung up on names and review for what I smell, not for what I hope, but I couldn’t help but want a true osmanthus scent from JM, since her Red Roses and Orange Blossom hit the nail on the head with such precision.

I think OB is about as compelling as the new Jasmin & Bergamote by L’Occitane. Longevity and projection are average. I won’t be owning this, but I’m not in the market for a green citrus floral.

OB is a safe bet for someone who wants to smell fresh, feminine, and ready for spring with open arms, but isn’t really sure what she wants in a fragrance, and abhors the idea of offending anyone around her. Ain’t nothin’ wrong with that.

Personally, I would be eager to see Charna Ethier of Providence Perfume Co. attempt an osmanthus soliflore in the same vein as her Hindu Honeysuckle (also a petitgrain-rich composition). I feel that the osmanthus blossom must be nearly impossible to replicate, and if anything can approximate it, the palette of natural perfumery may have the upper hand.

All the pics From the Old Computer 1329

Red Flower Organic Perfume Champa

23 Mar

Champa has a sweet bitter floral aura. Floral Aura. Say that five times fast.

Like fellow blogger Sherapop, I can not discern a whole lot in the way of individual notes, but I can pull out geranium essential oil, palmarosa, and something like sweet orange. When I exhale, there is a strange oily note sort of like petroleum jelly.

Champa is simultaneously smooth, sweet, earthy, balsamic, and sharp. It is very well blended, though in terms of its composition, it leaves me with some unanswered questions. Thank you to the lovely people at Red Flower for the sample.

Champa’s floral mixture conjures up a round shape and orange-yellow hue for me, but it also has a sinus-tingling potency from some of its bitter notes that makes me think it would repel insects.

It reminds me of Nature’s plethora of compelling warning signals, reminding potential enemies that it’s as deadly as it is pretty. It lasts quite a while but it does not project very far. However, something tells me insects can somehow smell this from miles away.

Champa seems like it was intended to be more of a functional fragrance than an aesthetic one. I get this sensation with quite a few (but definitely not all) essential oil-blend all natural-type fragrances.

Sweet orange, earthy bitter geranium, palmarosa, and Vaseline? This is not a bad scent and it gets the job done.. What that job specifically IS remains to be seen. I’ll try it again in mosquito season. I’m not joking. Mosquitoes love me.

Kilian In the Garden of Good and Evil: Good Girl Gone Bad

22 Mar

Good Girl Gone Bad is like a slightly sweet, clean, opalescent powder.

The wonderful Kilian reps at Saks were so generous to give me some samples, one of which was Good Girl Gone Bad.

It is soft and gentle, but as the light hits it and it warms up, different subtle colors can be detected: pinks, greens, yellows, and blues, all pastel in nature like a real white opal. It projects about as much as an opal colored powder would, so it’s pretty much a skin scent for the duration of its moderate lifespan.

There is a vaguely fruity element to these ambiguous florals, which start off rose, and then transform into “floral blend”. Also, right from the opening are gentle woody and warm amber elements. The powdery soft peachiness of this fragrance makes me immediately think “Kilian”, though this is not my favorite from In The Garden Of Good And Evil collection, nor from his other recent offerings in the fruity floral genre.

As it dries down, the powdery soapy aspect increases until it literally feels like I have baby powder in my nose when I hold it up to my skin and breathe. The final notes contain tiny gold flecks of amber against a very faint blue glimmer of aquatic musk.

Good Girl Gone Bad is very well blended and the composition is good, but it is not memorable. It’s like a very beautiful and expensive opal ring that you go to visit at the store with the intent to buy each time, then talk yourself out of it, so that EVERY TIME you leave the store empty-handed.

You want the ring, because it’s just so pretty, and it fits you, and if you had all the money in the world, you wouldn’t give buying it a second thought.

But all things considered, it’s inexplicably just. not. good. enough. C’mon..you know it.

Ineke Evening Edged in Gold

4 Mar

Evening Edged in Gold is a fragrance power animal, though I employ the term “power animal” here, in the most abstract sense of the concept: Mysterious and seemingly generated with the intention to give certain individuals tremendous strengths.

EEIG opens with mildly sweet, slightly under-ripe plums against dark wood and leather. If you don’t like leather in your fragrances, steer clear. This combination of notes results in new, barely cured, slightly salty, large green olives. The wood present in the opening reminds me of old wooden rafters in an art studio.

Evening Edged in Gold smells a little like strangely intoxicating flowers against a backdrop of fresh white paint in a large open studio with one wall of exposed brick and skylights. There are tubes of paint on rolling shelves and large canvases on wooden racks lining the walls. There is no one here.

Evening Edged in Gold is a quiet fragrance, though it has a firm presence. Projection and longevity are pretty good. It is softly dark, like an art studio closed for the night. All of its potential is presently at rest. I find it extremely unique, but also perfectly wearable. Easily unisex.

I would wear this for an occasion where I wanted to console myself while asserting my independence. Writing in a coffee shop or taking a solo trip to explore a new neighborhood. It is introspective without being distracting.

It is a wonderful treatment of soft, dry, earthy leather. It is deliberate but airy. The initial burst of sweetness in the opening which appears periodically throughout the development and in the dry down, reminds me of the darkness and sweetness of finished works of art, at rest in storage. They are quietly vibrating with their individual energies, like those things in nature that are beautiful but somehow manage to exist without demanding any recognition. In the dry down, a synergy of the notes takes place.

The dry down reminds me slightly of a more subtle, more tastefully executed, fluid, harmonious, and fresh/natural relative of Tom Ford’s Black Orchid. The dry down is really complementary to the natural scent of skin. Out of all of the fragrances Ineke was kind enough to let me experience, this is by far my favorite.

A rare and inspired, self-sufficient dark beauty.

The Different Company Osmanthus

21 Feb

Osmanthus by The Different Company is the scent of the cumulative hum of fragrances as you are rushing through the perfume section of a department store. As you soar down the main aisle with only slight glances at counters and into luminous stalls, you can’t help but think, “This is what the air would smell like every day if I worked here.” /

Osmanthus is the fragrance held inside of the empty paper shopping bag stuffed with crisp tissue paper from the same department store. As you lift the paper out, the scent escapes and you smell flowers briefly, faintly, and it’s nice. You consider placing the tissue paper into your sock drawer, but decide the scent would never transfer. /

You are sitting in the darkness, waiting for the performance to begin. A woman is also sitting somewhere in the audience. You can’t see her and you aren’t moved enough to try, but you do think to yourself: someone is wearing perfume. /

The silhouettes of flowers are floating in the negative space inside of a coat still warm from a woman’s body. The coat is hanging at the entrance to an expensive restaurant. /

This fragrance is like saying, “mom” when you feel bad, even if you don’t actually want to see your mom.

Osmanthus is the essence of familiarity, but at a distinct distance. If you never want to get closer, it won’t insist.

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