Tag Archives: patchouli

M. Micallef Royal Vintage

13 May

When testing fragrances with my boyfriend I often refer to them as things that help me contextualize them for both of us, and when I tested M. Micallef’s Royal Vintage, I kept referring to it as, that Aventus one. They are definitely not the same scent, but similar enough that my familiarity with Aventus makes me automatically associate the two fragrances.

For those who are not familiar with either, they are both warm, spicy, woody fragrances rounded out by some acidic fruits with a kind of smoky pineapple quality. However, They are not so similar that one can replace the other, and I feel that each is deserving of individual consideration, even if they are close cousins. To make a designer/female analogy, if that would be helpful to anyone, they are about as similar as Kenzo Amour and Dior Hypnotic Poison are to one another.

If ever leather could be refreshing, this fragrance is a perfect example. Bergamot peel, spicy woodsy notes and smoky sweet fruitiness all revolve around a clean light leather.

This would be a great summer evening vacation scent. It is soothing and romantic, with a very casual facet.

This fragrance is incredibly well rounded and balanced. It smells tropical, masculine, and expensive. Projection and longevity are excellent so apply carefully. It actually has the lasting power of indelible ink, on me it stayed THROUGH a shower, so make sure you’re definitely in the mood to wear it! If you enjoy spicy, warm, complex masculine citrus frags and aren’t adverse to a nicely blended leather, give this one a shot.

If I woke up next to a man who smelled from Royal Vintage, I would be like, “AAAAAA!! WHAT DID YOU DO WITH MY BOYFRIEND!?”
But then I would take a deep breath of his Aventus, er, I mean Royal Vintage, sigh, and think to myself,

“Mhm. Everything’s gonna be alright.”

the fur coat

Providence Perfume Co. Divine Noir

12 May

Divine Noir is sweet, woody, earthy, balsamic, warm, tangy, and aromatic. It smells like a complex artisan root beer with a spritz of bergamot and a shot of patchouli-infused wheat grass mixed into it. It is such a beautiful offering of naturally sweet and aromatic earthiness, I feel like eating it would make me stronger and more beautiful.

It is spicy, smooth, rich and deep, but its vibrant botanical quality lends the ingredients a translucency, which prevents it from ever becoming too much. In the dead of summer I could see it being a little too heavy, but on the right person, Divine Noir is so balanced and unique that it could easily be dressed up or down. The juice is dark (obviously) so be careful when applying because if you spray directly to a small area, it can temporarily stain skin the color of sunless tanner, until your next shower. Don’t let this deter you. Just spray over a larger area so the color isn’t concentrated like a splotch, and always apply before you dress, and you’ll be fine.

Divine Noir is an invisible door you can open into a private exotic environment. It’s like chocolate and wine-colored velvet curtains draped behind antique paned-glass windows. It’s a fragrance for feeling centered and confident while at the same time welcoming and alluring.  That said, it’s definitely not a perfume  for everyone, and probably not for most, which could be a good or bad thing depending on what you are looking for.

The bergamot and patchouli are prevalent in the opening, as well as the sarsaparilla and well, countless other things! Ahhh! It’s blowing my mind!

It honestly took me a while to find my footing in Divine Noir (as it is VERY strong and bold with good sillage and excellent longevity), but once I did, I could not stop sniffing the part of my arm I had sprayed. The most gorgeous vanilla emerges in the dry down; what a stunning finish to an incredible journey.

the difference

Kilian In the Garden of Good and Evil collection: In The City of Sin

2 Apr

In The City of Sin has a dry spicy opening. Pepper, cardamom, and incense float over resinous woods and warm muted fruit. The fruits are pushed down and restrained by the dry spices and dark woods. It is essentially, fruit in a cage. Thank you to the lovely Kilian reps at Saks, Kim and Will. They were wonderful to give me a sample of this.


In the City of Sin is the experience of visiting something strange, dark, and complex in order to discover sweetness buried beneath. The dry mix of spices and dark woods are an excellent compliment to the Summer fruits. In the City of Sin does not project too much, but once it dries down and its cage of spices and wood evaporates, it releases its soft sweet powdery fruits and lasts for hours close to the skin.

In the City of Sin is masculine and feminine. It is a little like some sort of spicy marinade at first, but give it a chance, and it undergoes a pleasant and unexpected transition or two, eventually drying down to a signature Kilian ambiguously fruity skin scent.

This fragrance’s lack of projection makes it appropriate for a wide range of situations, but it is certainly the most unusual composition of the three offerings from the In The Garden Of Good And Evil collection, so give it some time to develop before forming an opinion. Though I am not presently moved to purchase a FB of this, I also wouldn’t write it off. I think it’s about as noteworthy as Good Girl Gone Bad, though they smell nothing alike.

I recommend this especially for those who want to have the fruit elements of their fragrances perceptible, but restrained.

Officina Profumo-Farmaceutica di Santa Maria Novella: Melograno

28 Mar

I have been wearing Melograno for years but never attempted to describe it. It was gifted to me by a close friend and was one of the first fragrances I ever owned, so I was wearing it well before I understood doodly squat about thinking of fragrance in terms of classifications like chypres, note pyramids, and the idea of notes in the first place.

Instead I thought of all fragrances in terms of the colors they evoked in my head. Since then, I have learned a little more, so I’ll give it a shot. Melograno is no longer just the powdery opalescent white layered over burgundy fragrance it once appeared to be. Now when I smell it, I see rainbows. That may sound sentimental, but I really do.

Melograno opens with a sharp, spicy-green, soapy powder with a sweetish/bitter tinge. There is no “true to life” anything in Melograno. It doesn’t even smell like true to life baby powder, though the powder aspect is very prominent. The green is a dry, spicy green, not a lush verdant one; it’s very classic-smelling. The citrus is barely there in the top notes if at all. The rose/orris root is cool and soapy. The patchouli and vetiver are earthy and sweet, but run no risk of obscuring the other elements.

A trace of warmth comes through from the amber, ylang and tobacco, but this fragrance is so well blended and has so much dynamism that it really just IS. Though its notes are not so easy to separate, and are not “true to life”, they aren’t trying to be. Melograno smells like itself, and nothing else. It smells calm, wise and stern.

There is an entire world living inside Melograno, and in that respect I think it actually is very much like a pomegranate, though I am generally not too concerned with names and their accuracy. It fuses seamlessly with my own skin’s scent, but there is also so much complexity that I feel like I can peer into it and never get bored.

Melograno is like a woman who has seen it all. I could sit around admiring her all day.

All the pics From the Old Computer 1332

Jo Malone Grapefruit

27 Mar

Grapefruit is the perfect “morning” scent. It is dressed to the nines, briefcase in hand, checking the time and out the door to work. Look out, world… It’s Grapefruit!!!

Um…okay.

This is one of the most masculine-leaning grapefruits I have experienced so far. That said, it is still totally unisex to me. The dry spice and transparent earthiness make it feel like a light, refreshing face tonic.

I could see Grapefruit layering beautifully or working as a light everyday office scent (provided that you enjoy grapefruit of course). It does not project very far, so that’s also good for the office depending on where you work, and it’s longevity is great for a JM.

Grapefruit stands out to me because unlike other masculine/unisex citrus oriented scents on the market today, JM shows us a natural-smelling rendition of notes and their relationships. It’s not overly-simplistic but it also doesn’t smell abstract or synthetic.

My overall impression is  signature Jo Malone. I can immediately detect the way in which Grapefruit is a cousin to Lime Basil & Mandarin, as well as Amber & Lavender. This ability to create distinct scents while maintaining a signature feeling throughout is to me, a sign of a strong identity and consistent quality.

The person who wears this by itself is not interested in a scent that evolves and transforms dramatically over time. This is just a pretty compliment to the skin. True to life citrus, a hint of pepper and some aromatic herbs.

If you feel “out of it” this will wake you right up, and lift your spirits. Good morning! Now get out there and make us all proud.

Yves Saint Laurent Parisienne

20 Mar

…off the beaten berry path, across the train tracks and over to the electrical plant. Scandalous! Don’t get caught. See the huge sign on the barbed-wire fence that reads NO TRESPASSING? That means YOU, girly.

Parisienne is blackberry candy on the inhale, truck exhaust on the exhale…tangy purple gourmet lollipop on the inhale, asphalt and plastic casing on the exhale…

Wait, am I HUFFING this fragrance in an attempt to figure out what it smells like!? Does that mean I like it, or that something about it is oddly compelling, likes and dislikes aside…

There is a soapy dark chemical shadow in the background of this bright purple sweet and sour candy berry fragrance.

It’s like Strawberry Shortcake’s questionable older cousin: Blackberry Tail Pipe.

I think there is something surprisingly alluring about Parisienne. It has that synthetic purple berry “freshness” that actually goes well with the surrounding sooty chemicals and powder.

This projects a good distance, especially in warmer weather, so it’s probably best for outdoor activities and days when you will be doing a lot of traveling instead of sitting in one place for hours on end. Not something you want to stew in. Better to get wafts of it as you go about your day. It lasts straight through the day and into the evening.

When the berries eventually fade, cold florals take their place as the powder and shadowy industrial notes carry on.

Blackberry Candy *Plus*.

Fendi Fan di Fendi

18 Mar

My first experience of Fan di Fendi was at the duty free shop at JFK airport.

I was wandering around in a hunger-induced daze, when a friendly SA suggested I try Fan di Fendi and sprayed some on a card for me before I could respond. As she held the bottle up for me to see, she smiled and said, “It’s Italian” as if that should mean something specific to me. Before rolling my eyes, I decided to allow her words to reverberate through me. Something about the way she said them made the floor drop out from under me.

It was almost embarrassing to try Fan di Fendi right there as she looked on because I was so moved. Not by what her words meant to me, but by what I sensed they meant to her. As I held the test strip up to my nose, those moments became frozen in time.

Fan di Fendi smelled powerful, but nondescript. Common, but very well-balanced, as if it contained a little bit of every contemporary high-end designer fragrance on the market, all in one fragrance, in equal complimentary proportions.

I carried the test strip around in my bag the entire time I was in Florida, and by the time I came back, Fan di Fendi was a Sun-faded memory.

About six months later, I tried Fan di Fendi again while at Sephora, and took a small sample home to spend some time with.

On application I got the same green citrus opening followed by non-specific CGI florals plus leather, powder, etc. This time the floor did not drop away as I sniffed, but I still found it quite pleasing.

Recently, I read an article by Serguey Borisov on Fragrantica about the olfactory white phenomenon in fragrance, which supposedly occurs when all scents weigh in against each other simultaneously with equal potency (or something like that) such that it is impossible to detect anything specific in the olfactory digital snow. During the same week, I also happened to read another article  from the Huffington Post about two artists who collaborated on the creation of one fragrance by literally mixing together every fragrance that had been released in the year 2012. Their art experiment also seemed to be a white noise fragrance attempt of sorts.

Smelling Fan di Fendi for the second time reminded me of those white scent articles. Fan di Fendi is all the colors in equal proportions, and they are not pastels.

This fragrance also conjures memories of walking around a city on a very bright Sunny day. It is not tropical destination Sun, so much as stark urban Sun. Bright light beating down onto the expensive leather handbag of a typically sexy woman, as she leans against a Sun-drenched wall outside of her office building to take a smoke break.

The notion of Sunlight makes sense because light from the Sun emits all the colors at once in equal proportions, so to us it appears white, or invisible.

I would recommend this to anyone who wants to slap on a label that reads: I Am Urban Chic. On the right person, this could work as an every day fragrance, for a date, for the office, or even for a more formal occasion. It projects, so be careful, and longevity is definitely not an issue.

Because Fan di Fendi is my white noise fragrance of the moment, I find it to be relatively unmemorable and at the same time it has found a special place in my heart. Perhaps under the right conditions, its white light is momentarily refracted to form a rainbow.

Perhaps it’s the way the SA smiled when she said, “It’s Italian.”

Tasha Pilot-Slow

Painting and Assemblage

Rose Strang

Art and Photography by Rose Strang

[BELLA]VIA

lifestyle,illustrations,travel & beauty

Amy Berkowitz

Copywriter

nstperfume

a blog about perfume

Perfume Shrine

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

Modern Urban Sensory Experiences

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

My Life Among the Lithops (and Other Strange Plants)

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

Perfume Project NW

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

sherapop's salon de parfum

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

TurtleAndRobot.com

Children's Book Reviews

Pour Monsieur

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

From Pyrgos

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

Bigslyfragrance's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

silkroadcollector.me

An International company that offers private antique art sales to clients around the globe.

%d bloggers like this: