Tag Archives: pear

Fendi Fan di Fendi

18 Mar

My first experience of Fan di Fendi was at the duty free shop at JFK airport.

I was wandering around in a hunger-induced daze, when a friendly SA suggested I try Fan di Fendi and sprayed some on a card for me before I could respond. As she held the bottle up for me to see, she smiled and said, “It’s Italian” as if that should mean something specific to me. Before rolling my eyes, I decided to allow her words to reverberate through me. Something about the way she said them made the floor drop out from under me.

It was almost embarrassing to try Fan di Fendi right there as she looked on because I was so moved. Not by what her words meant to me, but by what I sensed they meant to her. As I held the test strip up to my nose, those moments became frozen in time.

Fan di Fendi smelled powerful, but nondescript. Common, but very well-balanced, as if it contained a little bit of every contemporary high-end designer fragrance on the market, all in one fragrance, in equal complimentary proportions.

I carried the test strip around in my bag the entire time I was in Florida, and by the time I came back, Fan di Fendi was a Sun-faded memory.

About six months later, I tried Fan di Fendi again while at Sephora, and took a small sample home to spend some time with.

On application I got the same green citrus opening followed by non-specific CGI florals plus leather, powder, etc. This time the floor did not drop away as I sniffed, but I still found it quite pleasing.

Recently, I read an article by Serguey Borisov on Fragrantica about the olfactory white phenomenon in fragrance, which supposedly occurs when all scents weigh in against each other simultaneously with equal potency (or something like that) such that it is impossible to detect anything specific in the olfactory digital snow. During the same week, I also happened to read another article  from the Huffington Post about two artists who collaborated on the creation of one fragrance by literally mixing together every fragrance that had been released in the year 2012. Their art experiment also seemed to be a white noise fragrance attempt of sorts.

Smelling Fan di Fendi for the second time reminded me of those white scent articles. Fan di Fendi is all the colors in equal proportions, and they are not pastels.

This fragrance also conjures memories of walking around a city on a very bright Sunny day. It is not tropical destination Sun, so much as stark urban Sun. Bright light beating down onto the expensive leather handbag of a typically sexy woman, as she leans against a Sun-drenched wall outside of her office building to take a smoke break.

The notion of Sunlight makes sense because light from the Sun emits all the colors at once in equal proportions, so to us it appears white, or invisible.

I would recommend this to anyone who wants to slap on a label that reads: I Am Urban Chic. On the right person, this could work as an every day fragrance, for a date, for the office, or even for a more formal occasion. It projects, so be careful, and longevity is definitely not an issue.

Because Fan di Fendi is my white noise fragrance of the moment, I find it to be relatively unmemorable and at the same time it has found a special place in my heart. Perhaps under the right conditions, its white light is momentarily refracted to form a rainbow.

Perhaps it’s the way the SA smiled when she said, “It’s Italian.”

Bvlgari Omnia Crystalline

15 Mar

Omnia Crystalline smells like an anime princess.

She has soft green eyes containing a sense of tranquility, and translucent sparkly hair which flows down to her knees. Her dress matches her eyes and hair. she has a crystal in the center of her forehead for some reason, as does her horse,(her best friend and confidant).

She is delicate and ethereal. Her proportions are impossible, and she shimmers like an optical illusion; she’s definitely not of this world.

Omnia Crystalline smells like sweet synthetic pear with a very light fruity musk, some powdery notes, and translucent CGI florals. There is a discernable aquatic note as it develops on my skin, which compliments the sweetness of the pear.

Crystalline wears close to the skin, and lasts all day, however daintily. Great for casual wear, and also special moments like mother-daughter bonding, mental health days off from work, etc.

There isn’t much going on here, but for that reason, this fragrance is almost impossible to have strong negative feelings about, since it’s only an anime princess.

How could anyone hate an anime princess?

M. Micallef Ananda

21 Feb

Ananda begins with the soft perfumed fruit scent of a babysitter’s hair.


It is an inoffensive though synthetic impression of pear and it is soft, very delicate, and feminine. It is sugary sweet, powdery and tart with citrus and currant. There is nothing remotely visceral about it as with other pears that have a pulpy, over-ripe pungency to them. This is a young innocent woman wearing pear in a gently lit children’s room.

The rose makes this fragrance slightly green, but as the fragrance wears on, the vanilla musk/mimosa in the base takes a gentle powdery control over the tart green notes, and only the synthetic silhouette of the pear lingers. Despite the sweetness, the soft delicacy of the dry down ensures that this fragrance never becomes cloying, if applied with reasonable discrimination.

Though it eventually turns into quite an easy and soothing skin scent, there is nothing overtly memorable in the conclusion to Ananda. The babysitter is warm, pleasant, and comforting, but in a few years you will forget her name, her face, and even the scent of her hair.

Lancome La Vie Est Belle

21 Feb

Warning: Graphic Review! Please do not read if you are easily grossed out by bodily functions. This is a respectful and sincere review.

I am not fundamentally against sweet, mass-marketed fragrances. I am a huge fan of Sugar Lychee by Fresh, and though I’m not sure I would ever want to wear it, I am delighted by the crimson raspberry Jello scent of Escada’s Cherry In The Air. That said, I still think that if you’re gonna do a synthetic gourmand-floral fragrance, you should be mindful of any bitter chemical “aftertaste” that could send the whole composition down the tubes.

Even though I could smell it from across the room before I opened the bottle, I had high hopes for this one. For clarity’s sake, I do not get sidetracked by bottles or titles when writing fragrance reviews and do my best to concentrate only on the juice itself, but in this instance, the bottle and the name were both begging the question: Is this in fact, what makes life beautiful? If not THE thing, then at least one of the things?

La Vie Est Belle by Lancome has a very sweet, ambiguously fruity and floral composition. The sillage is out of this world, and the longevity is excellent. After application and giving it a few minutes to settle, I sniffed deeply into it, trying to penetrate the layers of fluffy pink sugar sweetness and slightly green, slightly powdery and somewhat medicinal CGI florals.

What I found underneath these fluffy layers was a disturbingly bitter flat-line of chemical aftertaste. It was like an even streak of ugly yellow road paint severing this fragrance right through the center of its fluffy pink heart.
…Then I had to drop a #2.

I had to use the bathroom NOT BECAUSE of the fragrance! It was mere coincidence, and I only even mention it because I feel it is relevant to this review. This blog is about good and bad scents, really, ALL the scents, and my seemingly ill-timed trip to the bathroom turned out to be a blessing in disguise.

I was super unhappy about having to scrub my hands with dish detergent after using the bathroom and starting this review over, but while I was sitting there, lamenting this inevitability, La Vie Est Belle still projecting it’s chemical radiance in the direction of my face, something occurred to me.

This fragrance smells nothing at all like life. This is gonna sound ridiculous, but my own refuse smelled “fresh” compared to Lancome’s chemical monstrosity co-mingling in the air. Next to the smell of fresh #2, La Vie Est Belle, is the most inorganic, lifeless, and unpalatable concoction of elements imaginable. Try it and see for yourself.

It’s almost as if it were solely invented by a computer, for computers. It’s as if someone made it with utter lack of regard for our natural chemistry, and instead invented a fragrance for something that didn’t, doesn’t, and never will smell like anything living. While I was sampling, I was actually slightly nervous about my cat getting near it.

Please don’t get me wrong. I am not particularly enamored with the smell of poop, but AT LEAST it smells like what it’s supposed to. What began as an inconvenient natural urge ended up serving as a reminder to me that life (and the beauty it’s made of) do not include the realm of La Vie Est Belle. I never would have imagined I would have been forced to make this comparison, but now I am very grateful I did.

Tasha Pilot-Slow

Painting and Assemblage

Rose Strang

Art and Photography by Rose Strang

[BELLA]VIA

lifestyle,illustrations,travel & beauty

Amy Berkowitz

Copywriter

nstperfume

a blog about perfume

Perfume Shrine

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

Modern Urban Sensory Experiences

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

My Life Among the Lithops (and Other Strange Plants)

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

Perfume Project NW

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

sherapop's salon de parfum

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

TurtleAndRobot.com

Children's Book Reviews

Pour Monsieur

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

From Pyrgos

To stop and smell the roses takes a lifetime

Bigslyfragrance's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

silkroadcollector.me

An International company that offers private antique art sales to clients around the globe.

%d bloggers like this: